Findern manuscript online dating

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Findern manuscript online dating

He emphasizes continuities in the two works’ pastoral aims, countering Nicholas Watson’s assertion that the two works address lay readers in contrasting ways.] —. [This book considers the relationship between the church, society and religion across five centuries of change. [The essay discusses Wyclif’s use of Wisdom , a passage of scripture that, according to Campi, Wyclif regarded as “the most difficult verse in the whole of scripture…due to the theoretical content it conveys, which relates to the issue of the creative, legislative and redemptive order imposed by God.”] —. Sharpe substantially shares the metaphysical view and principles of the other Oxford Realists, but he elaborates a completely different semantics, since he accepts the nominalist principle of the autonomy of thought in relation to the world, and Ockham’s explanation for the universality of concepts. This article seeks to shed some light on this issue through an analysis of the text “Of Mynystris in the Chirche,” a commentary on Matthew 24 and one of the longest Lollard discussions of the Bible’s eschatological prophecies. Raschko examines how the Lollard writers direct this conventional social model to reformist ends.] —.

“The Letter of Richard Wyche: An Interrogation Narrative.” PMLA 127.3 (2012): 626-642. Brown examines how the teachings of an increasingly universal Church were applied at a local level and how social change shaped the religious practices of the laity. of the New Testament, in the Scottish dialets, in the possession of Lord Amherst of Hackne, on examination proves to be a Scottish rescension of Wyclif’s version.”] Bruce, Frederick F. “‘In ipso sunt idem esse, vivere, et intelligere’: Notes on a Case of Textual Bricolage.” pertaining to divine being, life, and thought. Unfortunately, this semantic approach partially undermines his defence of realism, since it deprives Sharpe of any compelling semantic and epistemological reasons to posit universalia in re. “Annihilatio e divina onnipotenza nel Tractatus de universalibus di John Wyclif.” Brocchieri and Simonetta 71-85. “Categories and Universals in the Later Middle Ages.” In Lloyd A. as an anti-Lollard critique by showing how artisans and Lollards were seen as reflections of each other.] Copeland, Rita. Specifically, this article points to a correspondence between a tension at the heart of Lollard attitudes to the theory and practice of scriptural exegesis and a tension at the heart of Lollard perspectives on end times events. “Oon of Foure: Harmonizing Wycliffite and Pseudo-Bonaventuran Approaches to the Life of Christ.” Johnson and Westphall 341-373.

The author examines the principal topics in Netter’s work—God, humanity, Christ, the Church, religious life, prayer, the sacraments—and he makes the case that there is a definite plan which links the various parts of the into a whole giving it a certain theological unity.”] Alford, John. Whereas Langland is more critically reflexive, Wyclif contradicts himself by endorsing the material interests of the secular elites.] —. Central to the book is Aers’s re-conceptualization of the notion of orthodoxy and its attendant term, heresy, terms which have come to define modern accounts of medieval sacramental theology, even where they are acknowledged to be imprecise descriptors of literary texts. Working from Slavoj Zizek’s claim that political identity is often founded on the fetishistic disavowal of a shared guilt, this work argues that the two parts of Henry IV, in their insistent metadramatic reminders of Oldcastle’s treason and execution, function to disturb the audience’s interpellation as subjects of Tudor-Protestant power.”] Bacher, John Rea. “‘Constantine From England and the Bohemians’: Hussitism, Orthodoxy, and the End of Byzantium.” . She argues that rather than directly condemn Lollards, as much contemporary Benedictine poetry did, these lyrics appropriated and adapted Lollard critiques to promote an orthodox agenda for church reform.] —.”‘This Holy Tyme’: Present Sense in the projects a unified, ethical kingdom that contrasts with “the divisions, factions, and unrest following the deposition of Richard II and the threats to the institutional church posed by the challenges of the Lollards.”] Barrows, C. “John Wycliffe.” , Sarah Beckwith explores the most lavish, long-lasting, and complex form of collective theatrical enterprise in English history: the York Corpus Christi plays. “Wyclif and Wycliffism at Oxford 1356-1430.” Catto and Evans 175-261. “Theology After Wycliffism.” Catto and Evans 263-280. “Fellows and Helpers: The Religious Identity of the Followers of Wyclif.” Biller and Dobson 141-62. “The King’s Government and the Fall of Pecock, 1457-58.” , was one of Wyclif’s scholarly disciples. Catto summarizes several of the anonymous texts which comment on Wyclif’s teachings on universals.] —. This study shows that a) in their explanation of what it means for a proposition to be true, Burley and Wyclif both develop what we could call a theory of intentionality in order to explain the relation that must obtain between the human mind and the truth-makers, and b) that their explanations reach back to Augustine, more precisely to his theory of ocular vision as exposed in the 49 (2011): 258-74. Focusing primarily on the writings of the English Dominican Robert Holkot, this paper explores a central transformation in fourteenth-century Eucharistic discourse. [Nisbet’s glosses show how a lay reader in the early to mid-sixteenth century negotiated between different versions of the New Testament.] Dove, Mary. Modern scholars, largely content to accept this claim, have struggled to identify exclusively Lollard elements in the manuscripts. For Wyclif, the Law of Christ calls upon Christians to conform themselves to the poor and humble Christ of the Gospels. “‘Authorial Intention’ and ‘Literal Sense’ in the Exegetical Theories of Richard Fitzralph and John Wyclif: An Essay in the Medieval Theories of Biblical Hermeneutics.” . To “locate Langland more precisely on the intellectual map of his day,” Minnis compares his use of Trajan to John Wyclif’s, especially “in relation to Wyclif’s unusual version of the . The question is deeply connected to whether women can preach, and therefore to the status of languages in which the Word might be preached.] —. [Minnis considers the theology of Brut’s arguments on women priests (recorded in Bp. He traces the echoes of Chaucer’s texts throughout contemporary philosophical and theological texts, including Wycliffite writings, concerned with truth and verifiability, women priests, sin, sexuality, and the sacraments.] —. as Critic of Wycliffite Exegesis.” , of Wyclif’s belief that “present-day religion is full of human institutions and traditions which have no Biblical precedent—and therefore they should be removed” (45), which argued that religious orders should also be removed. In this way, Lollardy becomes a space for proof of Kempe’s authority and orthodoxy.] Moser, Otto. [This is about Westminster School MS 3; it discusses the composition of the various booklets in the manuscript, revising earlier arguments by Hanna and others, to conclude that it was compiled in a secular context.] Mozley, J. Dividing work on sermons into “sermon,” “preacher,” and “society,” Muessig’s historiographical paper discusses how historians use sermons, investigate the diversity of preachers, and have developed studies which examine sermons as sources for intellectual and moral life in the middle ages.] Muir, Lawrence. Lollardy and Wyclif figure at several places in Staley’s argument, notably in her chapter on “Inheritances and Translations,” in how the heresy and Wyclif’s and other Lollard writings are used and rewritten during Richard’s reign.] Stanbury, Sarah.”Visualizing.” .

Since these bibliographies are meant to be complete listings of texts and studies relevant to Wycliffism, please let us know of any new references which should be included. The study has two parts: 1) Starting from Wyclif’s fivefold propositional typology—including a propositio realis (real proposition) and a sic esse sicut propositio significat (a fact)—we will analyse (a) the three different kinds of real predication, (b) the distinction between primary and secondary signification of propositions (the latter being an instantiation of the former) and (c) the status of logical truth as opposed to (but depending on) metaphysical truth. “John Ball’s Letters: Literary History and Historical Literature.” Hanawalt 176-200. This shows that Lollard influence on Gaunt, or at least on his extended household, lasted longer than has sometimes been supposed.] Green, Samuel Gosnell. Heresy was but one response to what were perceived as problems of the late Medieval spirituality; the church of York offered its own response to those problems. The article includes extensive discussion of the cross and its relation to affective devotion.] Harper-Bill, Christopher. In point of fact, however, Wyclif’s understanding of salvation is quite nuanced and well worth careful study.” The purpose of Levy’s essay, in which he considers earlier work by Lechler, Robson, and Kenny, “is to offer a full appraisal of Wyclif’s soteriology in its many facets. of such doctrine from Wyclif’s Latin works to the vernacular records of fifteenth-century heresy trials, we may perhaps gain a little insight into how certain men and women, from East Anglia and Kent, sought to theorize the business of love and marriage in light of a version of Christianity which combined a strong predestinarian impulse with a strict puritanism in sexual matters” (190). Aristotle recognises that we can talk about substances in many different ways; we can introduce them by using ‘substantial’ names, but also by using names derived from the substances’ accidental features. [Steiner concentrates on the so-called “Long” and “Short Charters of Christ.” She argues that “late medieval preachers and polemicists used documents, both fictive and real, to challenge orthodox notions of textual authority and to produce an oppositional rhetoric. “Reginald Pecock’s Vernacular Voice.” Somerset, Havens, and Pitard 217-236. The article, then, concentrates “on examining more fully the methodological implications of Netter’s commitment to a fully contextualized reading of his patristic authorities” (234). Chapter three analyzes Pecock’s position on the controversial issue of lay Bible reading, highlighting his efforts to draw readers away from the Lollard textual community into a new community structured around the authoritative book of reason. “‘Iusti sunt omnia’: Note a margine del ‘De statu innocencie’ di John Wyclif.” (c. Here Wyclif paints the features of man in the Edenic state, connecting them to some remarkable themes concerning nature, dominion, grace and free will. [This essay, a contribution to a special section on “Langland and Lollardy,” argues that Langland engages with “lollard” genres in order to think through critiques of theoretical poverty. More broadly, however, he argues that study of ecclesiastical humanism raises questions about the relevance of “the Wycliffite paradigm” in the latter half of the fifteenth century.] Coleman, Janet. [“The article focuses on the poem “Saint Erkenwald” . Additionally, it presents the discovery of a sarcophagus containing an inexplicably preserved corpse. [Levy describes Wyclif’s views on the authority of scripture, the nature of the literal sense, and the relationship between personal piety and exegesis as typical of late medieval theologians. She situates medieval drama, therefore, both in its vernacular literary setting, as a genre composed against the same cultural background as is a study of the interpretation of the Bible in the late Middle Ages. [A detailed discussion that starts with Biblical scholarship, and moves to ways in which biblical knowledge was disseminated to the laity during the century, including the Wycliffite translation along with private devotions and sermons. [Otto discusses how Giles of Rome and John Wyclif developed Augustine’s ecclesiology, especially ideas from City of God, into two contrasting arguments about the institutional church’s authority.] Overstreet, Samuel A. “‘Antichrist’ bei Wyclif.” Patschovsky and Šmahel 83-98. and Wycliffite writings in light of Langland’s B-C revisions. [Abstract:” This article examines the contents and manuscript contexts of the Lollard treatise ‘A Schort Reule of Lif’ to show how Lollards participated in mainstream religious trends and more orthodox Christians utilized a Lollard text that appealed to their common interests. Specifically, she outlines “some of the fundamental questions about method raised by Netter’s use of St. “Reversing the Life of Christ: Dissent, Orthodoxy, and Affectivity in Late Medieval England.” Johnson and Westphall 55-77. [According to the abstract, “This dissertation points to the ambitious nature of Pecock’s comprehensive program for lay education, investigating the reasons why Pecock felt so strongly about the need for his rational, philosophical texts among pious lay readers. Chapter four focuses on the relations that Pecock envisions between members of this textual community . Lacking nothing, man originally had a perfect constitution and a natural dominion on all creatures, planned to serve God’s glory. Cole points out that Langland’s use of “loller(e)” in the C-text may seem “late, inapposite, and idiosyncratic” because modern critics have romanticized 1382 as the originary “moment of heresiogenesis” (25). It also demonstrates its allegiance to orthodox eucharistic theology and the terms of its account of the judge’s conversion. At the foundation of this unwieldy poem lies distinct philosophical assumptions that hearken back to orthodox, realist sources and positions, expressed most relevantly to Chaucer’s interests and time period in Boethius’s in particular. He argues that because Netter and others distort Wyclif’s beliefs, scholars too often read Wyclif’s works through “the lens of heresy” and disregard his more conventional theology.] Lewald, Ernst Anton. Nach den Quellen dargestellt und Kritische beleuchtet.” 88 (Winter/Spring 2009): 1-23. Scholastic theologians developed a distinct attitude toward textual meaning in the thirteenth and fourteenth centuries which departed significantly from earlier trends. According to Ocker, “This was a conservative century for the church, marked by reactions to Hussites and Wycliffites and by attempts to restore the papal monarchy and adapt to the encroaching impossibility of papal temporal influence outside Italy” (488).] Odlozilík, Otakar. “A Controversy on Confirmation: Thomas Netter of Walden and Wyclif.” Bergström-Allen and Copsey 317-332. “‘Grammaticus Ludens’: Theological Aspects of Langland’s Grammatical Allegory.” . Pearsall argues that artistic clarity and “local economy of expression” (16), not disavowal, motivated changes to the B-text. 1 By providing regular times and subjects for prayer, along with advice for Christian living according to a three-estates model, ‘A Schort Reule of Lif’ appealed to a growing lay desire for more structured forms of devotion. [Bose investigates how Wycliffite and other reformist writers used the life of Christ to “anchor, define, and legitimize” their positions, describing Christ’s vita as common discursive ground for scholastic theologians. [A commentary on Wyclif and studies of his life just before the quincentary of his death. In the play, Falstaff represents a reformationist distrust of the image and reflects. “Reginald Pecock’s vision of religious education for ‘alle cristen peple’ in fifteenth-century England.” Ph. The first two chapters examine continuities between the sophisticated religious prose of the late fourteenth century and Pecock’s corpus in terms of the way that these works sought to influence the pious laity through instruction on devotional practices . This state is used as a standard of measure of the fallen man’s condition. He goes on to argue that Lollardy emerges from Wycliffism, but it also goes beyond “a set of classifiable (and condemnable) beliefs” (27), offering a kind of “generic consistency” for texts, both Wycliffite and not, written both before and after 1382.] —. Moreover, it suggests how its orthodoxy is constructed through its baptismal aspects.”] —. Standing on the firm ground of Augustinian realism, Wyclif disputes the modern logicians, who refute the existence of universals and thus chip away at the foundations of the Christian faith. [Lollards adapted the content of some orthodox works, including commentaries on the basics of the faith. [Mc Cormack discusses passages in which lollardy is mentioned or alluded to in Chaucer’s works, and reviews critical commentary on these passages.] —. Their attitude tended to erode the distinction, emphasized by the scholars of St. “Wyclif’s Influence upon Central and Eastern Europe.” New Brunswick: Rutgers Univ. [O’Donnell outlines Wyclif’s argument against Confirmation in the , Netter’s extensive reply, and puts them into context, noting that both were rehearsing earlier arguments, but that differences occur in methodology, especially in Netter’s disagreement with Wyclif’s 61.1 (Jan. [“The article discusses the tenure of 14th-century English theologian and church reformer John Wycliffe as the prebend of Aust in the collegiate church of Westbury-on-Trym in Gloucestershire, England. Abhandlungen der Akademie der Wissenschaften in Göttingen, Philologisch-Historische Klasse 3, Folge 179. While it is possible that some changes were made for ideological reasons, on the whole, changes made with regard to “sensitive matters” stressed the “nature of the poem as a poem” (10).] Peck, Russell. The text survives in seven fifteenthcentury religious miscellanies, ranging from predominantly Lollard collections to those with primarily mainstream texts. In addition to Wycliffite sermons, the essay analyzes works by Reginald Pecock and Nicholas Love’s Mirror.] Bostick, Curtis V. For a contemporary review, see “Wiclif and his Works,” included below. Lord Cobham or John Castle, the leader of the Lollard rebellion and friend of the young Prince Henry, the fictional character of Falstaff pricks the prince’s conscience about his family’s theft of the crown. My primary concern shall be to show how this treatise can be considered as an important laboratory where Wyclif tests the concepts he was working on.”] —. ] Whethamstede’s poem shows how in England the two Latin styles could work together in opposing the dissident tradition of vernacular theology, as represented in the lollard movement” (21-2). “William Langland and the Invention of Lollardy.” Somerset, Havens, and Pitard 37-58. “Money and the Plow, Or the Shipman’s Tale of Tithing.” 49.4 (2015): 449-73. [From the abstract: “This dissertation studies the House of Fame in light of its intellectual context and its social and literary milieu. In Boethius’s and Wyclif’s defense of universals, the themes and concerns of their work align closely with those of Chaucer, in particular in his emphasis on the connection that exists between word and deed, between language and reality. Of the three so-called “Lollard” commentaries on the Pater Noster, one–the longer of the two in Arnold–“combines radically Lollard complaints,” but “a close look at the text reveals its strong connection to the existing commentary tradition, not only in terms of its ideas, but also in terms of its vocabulary and phrasing. Victor in the twelfth century, between literal and spiritual senses of scripture. The prebendary, one of four benefices held by Wycliffe in his life, is controversial because the economic benefit he derived from it seems to conflict with Wycliffe’s reputation as a critic of the Catholic Church. Analysis of scribal revision, along with a new critical edition that records variation across all seven manuscripts, shows that most scribes copied the text without concern over its Lollard affiliation. 2, contains a discussion of Oxford, with a brief mention of Wyclif.

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